Tendonitis vs Tendinosis: What Is The Difference?

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What is the difference between Tendinitis and Tendinosis? First, it’s important to understand what a tendon is. A tendon is an elastic fiber that connects muscle to bone. It creates stability and helps with movement.

Unlike muscles and other tissues, tendons have a poor blood supply, limiting their healing abilities. Through repetitive movements, overuse, and improper mechanics; a tendon can become overwhelmed causing injury. 

Tendonitis occurs from acute overuse of the tendon, appearing swollen, inflamed, and painful to the touch. If left untreated for greater than 4 weeks or so, tendinitis can result in a chronic condition failing to heal, called tendinosis. With tendinosis, the tendon becomes structurally disorganized, thickened, and scarred. This may be diagnosed on musculoskeletal ultrasound or MRI typically. Oftentimes these tendons require treatments that attempt to restore blood flow and normal function. 

Tendons throughout the body can develop chronic tendinosis including rotator cuff, tennis and golfer’s elbow, gluteal, quadricep, patella (jumper’s knee), and Achilles tendons. Injections of steroids have shown to be damaging to tendons increasing the risk of rupture with other side effects and are no longer the standard of care.

A variety of approaches may commonly be used to stimulate blood flow and healing include compression sleeves, physical therapy,  deep tissue work (ART/Graston), myofascial release, ultrasound-guided injections, and mechanical stimulation via shockwave. 

Using minimally invasive treatments, our expert physicians at Orthohealing Los Angeles can confidently put you on the path to comprehensive healing.

See if you’re a candidate for advanced minimally invasive treatments for joint pain by Requesting an Appointment with us today.

Get on the path to comprehensive healing and long-term pain relief today.

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